Book Quotes

The book was just something that came along after we played the Super Bowl and I wrote a little essay that went online. Then I had two or three weeks and I said, wow, that essay was pretty good. Maybe I’ll try and write some other stuff. Writing about the depression, I just felt – you know, when you write a book like this, you have to open up your life. You have to be willing to do so to a certain degree.

That Elvis, man, he is all there is. There ain’t no more. Everything starts and ends with him. He wrote the book. But for him, I’d be selling encyclopedias right now. There have been a lotta tough guys. There have been pretenders. And there have been contenders. But there is only one king.

I think so much of our society is geared towards mainstream media and pop culture and so forth. And there’s a huge divide between the artist and the fan. And with indie culture that wall is removed. You actually do see the musicians walking around enjoying the show. It’s a distinctly different culture and for the 99% of Nirvana fans that caught up with them with Nevermind, my book is gonna give them a whole different take on Kurt [Cobain] and the band.

I would be the last to disparage the genius of the politicians who make our laws,” Hutchison wrote around that time, “the writers who make our books, the artists who make our pictures, but in gauging the true culture of the nation and reckoning its tensile strength, let the student not neglect hockey

Works of art are not so much finished as abandoned. Perhaps poems can be perfect. A short-short story might even be perfectible, as effective and enjoyable for one reader as the next. But novels and other book-length narratives are great rambling things that always contain some flaws. For works of any length, there comes a point when your continued tinkering won’t improve the whole, but will just trade one set of problems for another.

If you want to pontificate, I’m certainly willing to pontificate. That’s why Joely was laughing because you don’t know what you asked for. Malcolm Gladwell, in his newest book “David and Goliath,” writes about how sometimes things that we think of as handicaps often times are just the opposite. Or the reverse is also true.