Barry Lynes

A noted cancer specialist in Boston said he believed that if some simple and inexpensive replacement for Chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer were found tomorrow, all US medical schools would teeter on the verge of bankruptcy, so integral a part of their hospital revenues is oncology, the medical specialty of cancer treatment

It is important to emphasize again and again and again that finding a cure is not the problem The cures for many cancers, if not most cancers, exist. But they are not being offered to the patient who has cancer…. Being legally permitted to use an alternative cancer therapy is the problem

Dean Burk, PhD, of the National Cancer Institute (head of their Cytochemistry Section and 32-year veteran at the agency) declared in a (May 30,1972) letter to (congressman Louis Frey, Jr.) that high officials of the FDA, AMA and ACS (American Cancer Society), were deliberately falsifying information, literally lying…and in other ways thwarting potential cancer cures to which they were opposed.

Treating only terminal cancer patients, the Rand (anti-cancer) vaccine produced objective improvement in 35% of 600 patients while another 30% demonstrated subjective improvement. FDA stopped the vaccine’s use in a federal court hearing where neither the cancer patients nor their doctors were allowed to testify.

The AMA virtually stopped the Rife treatment in 1939, first by threatening the physicians using Rife’s instrument, then by forcing Rife into court….During the period 1935 to early 1939, the leading laboratory for electronic or energy medicine in the USA, in New Jersy, was independently verifying Rife’s discoveries…(this) laboratory was “mysteriously” burned to the ground…..Rife’s treatment was ruthlessly suppressed by the AMA’s Morris Fishbein.

In 1975, the respected British medical journal Lancet reported on a study which compared the effect on cancer patients of (1) a single chemotherapy, (2) multiple chemotherapy, and (3) no treatment at all. No treatment ‘proved a significantly better policy for patients’ survival and for quality of remaining life.’