Benjamin Hoff

The major lesson Tiggers need to learn is that if they don’t control their impulses, their impulses will control them. No matter how much they do, Tiggers are never satisfied because they don’t know the feeling of accomplishment that eventually comes when one persistently applies one’s will to the attaining of non-immediately-reachable goals.

It’s not surprising, therefore, that the [Bisy] Backson thinks of progress in terms of fighting and overcoming. One of his little idiosyncrasies, you might say. Of course, real progress involves growing and developing, which involves changing inside, but that’s something the inflexible Backson is unwilling to do.

Eeyore religion says that the earth isn’t worth saving, anyway, and that when it comes to an end, the Faithful will be transported instantly to heaven. No problem. We’d like to see them explain things to Saint Peter at the Gate, when he asks them what they did with the world that God entrusted to them. That might get a bit sticky.

“When you wake up in the morning, Pooh,” said Piglet at last, “what’s the first thing you say to yourself?””What’s for breakfast?” said Pooh. “What do you say, Piglet?””I say, I wonder what’s going to happen exciting today?” said Piglet . Pooh nodded thoughtfully.”It’s the same thing,” he said.”What’s that?” the Unbeliever asked.”Wisdom from the Western Taoist,”I said.”It sounds like something from Winnie-the-Pooh,” he said.”It is,” I said.”That’s not about Taoism,” he said.”Oh, yes it is,” I said.

Within each of us there is an Owl, a Rabbit, and Eeyore, and a Pooh. For too long, we have chosen the way of Owl and Rabbit. Now, like Eeyore, we complain about the results. But that accomplishes nothing. If we are smart, we will choose the way of Pooh. As if from far away, it calls us with the voice of a child’s mind. It may be hard to hear at times, but it is important just the same, because without it, we will never find our way through the forest.

From the state of the Uncarved Block comes the ability to enjoy the simple and the quiet, the natural and the plain. Along with that comes the ability to do things spontaneously and have them work, odd as that may appear to others at times. As Piglet put it in Winnie-the-Pooh, “Pooh hasn’t much Brain, but he never comes to any harm. He does silly things and they turn out right.”

The urge to grow and develop, present in all forms of life, becomes perverted in the Bisy Backson’s mind into a constant struggle to change everything (the Bulldozer Backson) and everyone (the Bigoted Backson) else but himself, and interfere with things he has no business interfering with, including practically every form of life on earth.