Brad Warner

True nonattachment is understanding that you are fundamentally attached to everything and, through that understanding, dropping your attachment to the view that you are detached from that which you encounter. At the same time, real nonattachment means not clinging to things or people. It means dropping the idea that if you don’t have this or if you can’t get that, your life will be a catastrophe.

Buddhists have a long-standing tradition of believing that at some level we always know what the best course of action is in any given situation. We just have to be quiet enough to let that course of action present itself to us. And we need the confidence to act when life shows us what we need to do.

There’s fantasies about what heaven is like and who Satan is and why you shouldn’t masturbate or why you should vote Republican. It’s funny because it’s an election year and their news broadcasts are constantly talking about “Vote Republican”. I think that they think they’re being subtle about it, but that’s definitely not the case. So I’m like, “What does this have anything to do with the nice advice you were giving about how to live your life, how to get along with your spouse etc?”

Buddhism doesn’t promise to fulfill our desires. Instead it says, ‘You feel unfulfilled? That’s okay. That’s normal. Everybody feels unfulfilled. You will always feel unfulfilled. There is no problem with feeling unfulfilled. In fact, if you learn to see it the right way, that very lack of fulfillment is the greatest thing you can ever experience.’ This is the realistic outlook.

I guess what attracted me about the philosophy aspect was that it was realistic. It didn’t go off into the realm of imagination land, which I find a lot of religious teachings, actually almost every religious teaching does. I keep meaning to write this up as a blog post, but lately, while driving in my car I’ve been listening to a religious station that comes on out of Cleveland from the Moody Bible Institute.